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William Elliott

b. 1879, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, d. 1 Dec 1931, NEW YORK, NY, USA. Early looks Elliott produced on Broadway in performing roles consist of That Man And I (1904), Beau Brummell as well as the Misanthrope (both 1905) and Charley’s Aunt (1906). He is at the musicals A Grand Military Man (1907) as well as the Pink Woman (1911). From hereon, Elliott was mainly active like a maker, mainly of takes on, like the Governor’s Woman (1912), Kitty Mackay (1914) and THE BEST Country (1916), which he also wrote and where he performed. In 1917 he created many musicals, some in cooperation with F. Ray Comstock and Morris Gest. To begin these was Oh, Young man!, music by Jerome Kern, publication and lyrics by Man Bolton and P.G. Wodehouse, which went for 467 shows in the Princess and Gambling establishment theatres. Next was Keep It To Jane, once again by Kern, Bolton and Wodehouse, which went for 167 shows, accompanied by Chu Chin Chow and Kitty Darlin’. The next 12 months was also occupied with musicals Oh, Woman! Lady!!, Maid FROM THE Mountains and Oh, My Dear! The second option, with music by Louis Hirsch and publication and lyrics by Bolton and Wodehouse, went for 189 shows in the Princess and 39th Road theatres. Elliott’s last Broadway creation was a play, THE HOUSE Towners (1926). Additional stage and film people who have the same or an identical name consist of William H. Elliott, who made an appearance in Broadway dramas Robert Emmet (1904) and A GOOD SON (1918) and who might probably become the same acting professional as talked about above; William ‘Crazy Expenses’ Elliott (b. Gordon Nance, 16 Oct 1904, d. 26 November 1965), who produced westerns under this name, his actual name, so that as Gordon Elliott; William Elliott, who performed on Broadway in Revenge With Music (1934) as well as the Eternal Street (1937); William Elliott (b. 1953), who organized music for Ain’t Misbehavin’ (1978) and various other shows.

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