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Zvuki Mu

Led by singer, songwriter, poet, actor, and all-around artistic troublemaker Pyotr Manonov, Zvuki Mu was mostly of the bands from the so-called “Russian Revolution” in past due-’80s pop music that merited greater than a casual glimpse from European audiences. (Instead of bands just like the incredibly boring hard rockers Gorky Recreation area.) Shaped in 1981 by Manonov, who was simply already a released writer in his early 30s, Zvuki Mu (actually “noises of moo,” an absurdist name that fits Manonov’s playful lyrical design) performed significantly above-ground gigs in Russia and Eastern European countries through the entire ’80s. By 1989, as Mikhail Gorbachev’s glasnost plans were taking impact as well as the Iron Drape was beginning to crumble, Zvuki Mu started to create a name for themselves in the Western, to the idea that Brian Eno authorized the group to his personal Opal label and created their 1st recording, 1989’s Zvuki Mu. Because of this 1st recording, the lineup was Pyotr Manonov on vocals, Lyosha Bortnichuk on acoustic guitar, Pavel Hotin on keyboards, Sasha Lipnitsky on bass, and Lyova Pavlov on drums; just about any Zvuki Mu record includes a different lineup compared to the one before, with Manonov the only real continuous. The group’s exclusive mixture of jazz, rock and roll, Zappa-like weirdness, and simple political content material was very popular among the even more adventurous fringes from the Traditional western pop picture, but a larger breakthrough never emerged. Following the U.S.S.R.’s collapse, Russian rock and roll & roll dropped the majority of its exotic characteristics and Western interest wandered somewhere else. Another Opal record, Zima (Wintertime), implemented in 1991, but all Zvuki Mu albums from then on were released just in Eastern European countries, where the music group maintain a fairly large group of fans. A few of these albums consist of 2001’s Delicious chocolate Pushkin, 2002’s Electro T, and over twelve others, a lot of which dual as soundtracks to Pyotr Manonov’s movie theater pieces.

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