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Tag Archives: Jimmy Cliff

Nicky Thomas

Nicky Thomas was created Cecil Nicholas Thomas in Portland, Jamaica, in 1949. His 1st hit in the hawaiian islands was “Operate Nigel Operate,” made by Derrick Harriot in 1969, but Thomas’ most effective songs were documented with maker Joe Gibbs, like the fantastic “Like of the normal People,” which rode …

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Justin Hinds

Within a crucial period that bore witness towards the emergence of ska and its own later on mutations into rocksteady and lastly reggae, Justin Hinds was being among the most successful saving artists around the Jamaican music scene, his sweet tenor spotlighted on a huge selection of Duke Reid-produced singles …

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Jimmy Cliff

It’s among the music industry’s great ironies that today, beyond reggae circles, Jimmy Cliff could very well be better known for his film performances than his music. Also following a string of strikes, the vocalist never quite were able to break right into the mainstream, although he appeared poised for …

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Johnny Nash

Though in no way an artistic innovator about par with contemporaries such as for example Bob Marley or Jimmy Cliff, singer Johnny Nash however proved a pivotal force behind the mainstream approval of reggae using the international success of his 1972 chart-topper “I COULD See Clearly Right now.” Given birth …

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Johnny Kemp

Kemp began singing in nightclubs in his hometown of Nassau, Bahamas, when he was just 13. He shifted to Harlem in 1979, developing his various other talents being a dancer, songwriter, and professional. “Simply Got Paid” was a high Ten strike in 1988; he eventually did a melody for the …

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Horace Andy

Among Jamaica’s most distinguished and beloved vocalists, Horace Andy is blessed with probably one of the most distinctive voices on the isle and his emotive delivery just gives further pounds to his status. His traditional recordings through the ’70s remain important hearing, while his newer use trip-hop heroes Massive Assault …

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Ernest Ranglin

A pioneering push behind the rise of Caribbean music, acoustic guitar virtuoso Ernest Ranglin was created in Manchester, Jamaica, in 1932. He started playing ukulele like a son, quickly graduating to acoustic guitar; during his teenagers he began carrying out live both locally and in the Bahamas, frequently in tandem …

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UB40

Named following a Uk unemployment benefit type, pop-reggae group UB40 were shaped within a welfare range in 1978, and their multiracial lineup shown the working-class community their members originated from. The music group consolidated its road credibility with politics topics attractive to dissatisfied youngsters and got a lift from fans …

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Don Carlos

Sweet-voiced vocalist and composer Don Carlos (blessed: Euvin Spencer) has already established his ideal success singing with Dark Uhuru, the reggae trio he shaped in 1974 with two close friends — Rudolph Dennis and Derrick “Duckie” Simpson — in the “Waterhouse” district in Kingston. Carlos documented only one one using …

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Errol Dunkley

Among reggae’s early performers, Errol Durkley bridged the origins music of Jamaica, in the 1960s, and London’s Brit-reggae picture from the ‘70s. His biggest strike, a remake of John Holt’s “Okay Fred”, which hardly missed the united kingdom top in 1978, was re-recorded, like a duet with Queen Sister *N*, …

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