Home / Tag Archives: Pre-War Country Blues

Tag Archives: Pre-War Country Blues

Otto Virgil

Mississippian Otto Virgil (his last name actually has been Virgial) documented two one 78s in Chicago for Bluebird Records in Halloween in 1925, “LITTTLE LADY in Rome” b/w “Poor Idea Blues” and “Got the Blues On the subject of Rome” b/w “Seven Year Itch.” Those four edges, which feature fairly …

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Myrtle Jenkins

An excellent early Chicago blues pianist, the little-known Myrtle Jenkins, occasionally billed mainly because Miss Myrtle Jenkins, was the featured piano participant on many of Bumble Bee Slim’s recordings for the Bluebird, Vocalion, and Decca imprints, and she played piano aswell (and sometimes sang) with Priscilla Stewart, Mary Mack, the …

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Mississippi Matilda

Matilda Powell, who have performed beneath the name Mississippi Matilda, married multi-instrumentalist Eugene Powell, who have performed beneath the name Sonny Son Nelson, in the 1930s, as well as the few, along with Willie Harris, Robert Hill, and people from the Mississippi Sheiks, traveled to New Orleans in 1936 to …

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Willie Borum

b. 4 November 1911, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, d. c.60s. Borum discovered guitar as a kid from his dad and Jim Jackson, afterwards adding harmonica, which he discovered very much from Noah Lewis. He performed in the roads in jug rings, and proved helpful in Mississippi with Garfield Akers, Willie Dark …

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Dan Sane

Most widely known for his function in cooperation with electric guitar partner Frank Stokes, Dan Sane was created in Michigan, Mississippi on January 24, 1904. Upon relocating to Memphis through the 1920s, he performed in the string music group led by violinist Will Batts; there Sane first started using Stokes, …

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Nap Hayes

In Feb of 1928, guitarist Napoleon “Nap” Hayes and mandolinist Matthew Prater, two dark musicians from Vicksburg, MSi, documented 4 instrumental tunes in Memphis. The music — “Somethin’ Doin’,” “Easy Champion,” “Nothin’ Doin’,” and “Prater Blues” — display the clean musicianship of both players, with Hayes’ electric guitar providing a …

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Fiddlin’ Joe Martin

b. 8 January 1900, Edwards, Mississippi, USA, d. 21 November 1975, Wall space, Mississippi, USA. Martin discovered electric guitar and trombone being a guy, later on adding mandolin and bass fiddle (therefore his nickname). He turned to washboard and drums in the 40s after harming his hands inside a open …

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Walter “Kid” Smith

A performer may be tempted to improve a name as common as Smith, and perhaps this is why why a great deal more than fifty percent the recordings created by this old-timey musician arrived under pseudonyms. For reasons uknown that Walter “Child” Smith made a decision to submerge his identification, …

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Gus Cannon

An extraordinary musician (he could play five-string banjo and jug simultaneously), Gus Cannon bridged the difference between early blues as well as the minstrel and folk designs that preceded it. His music group from the ’20s and ’30s, Cannon’s Jug Stompers, represents the apogee from the jug music group style. …

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Keghouse

Keghouse was a St. Louis blues vocalist (his 1st name is considered to have already been Gordon) who documented six songs for OKeh Information on Feb 17 and 18, 1928, in Memphis, TN, accompanied by four even more songs for Vocalion Information documented on November 23, 1928, also in Memphis. …

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