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Peggy Scott & Jo Jo Benson

In the later ’60s, the female-male duo of Peggy Scott and Jo Jo Benson produced the pop Top 40 3 x (charting higher in the R&B section) using a clutch of good-natured Southern pop/soul tunes. Semi-legendary manufacturer Huey Meaux, who acquired worked thoroughly with such spirit and rock and roll legends as Barbara Lynn and Doug Sahm, was in charge of putting the group together, and created their first classes in 1968 in Jackson, MS. After “Lover’s Vacation” and “Pickin’ Crazy Hill Berries” yielded a few quick strikes, the producer’s seat was turned to Shelby Singleton, who slice a few classes with the set in Nashville. A few of these songs were notable for his or her fusion of spirit and nation influences; several featured best Nashville session males Jerry Kennedy (on acoustic guitar) and, even more unusually, Pete Drake, possibly the first white nation musician (and one among the few) to try out steel guitar on the spirit record. Scott and Benson had been competent skills, but ultimately would need to become categorized as rather-average performers who didn’t set up a especially distinguished or fascinating style. The united states influence as well as the unusual sitar-ish guitar firmness on many of their information were probably the most novel points they had heading. Under Singleton’s assistance, they got their third strike within a 12 months with perhaps their finest track, “Spirit Tremble,” but just managed yet another minor strike, “I wish to Like You Baby,” before departing Singleton’s SSS International label for Atco. Their romantic relationship currently strained, the duo’s profession petered out after several obscure singles in the first ’70s. Almost 25 years afterwards, Scott — today referred to as Peggy Scott-Adams — came back to a documenting career with many albums on Miss Butch.

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