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Tag Archives: Sardonic

J.D. Souther

While J.D. Souther might have produced his biggest effect on the country-rock audio behind the moments or in a assisting role for some of the larger pop names from the ’70s, he previously an extraordinary and critically acclaimed group of single albums which have unfortunately basically vanished from music enthusiasts’ …

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The Kinks

Although they weren’t as boldly innovative because the Beatles or as well-known because the Rolling Stones or the Who, the Kinks were probably one of the most influential bands from the British Invasion. Like the majority of bands of the period, the Kinks started as an R&B/blues clothing. Within four …

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Bongwater

Just as much a performance artwork troupe like a music group, Bongwater was the brainchild of guitarist (Tag) Kramer — main from the Shimmy-Disc label along with a former person in Shockabilly — and actress Ann Magnuson, most widely known to mainstream viewers for her part within the ABC sitcom …

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Bill Callahan

After almost twenty years of utilizing the alias Smog for his music, Expenses Callahan turned to his given name for his releases after 2005’s A River Ain’t A great deal to Like. The 2007 EP Gemstone Dancer and full-length Woke on the Whaleheart both combined the personal, reflective, mainly acoustic …

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Baader Meinhof

Baader Meinhof was a one-off task from the Auteurs’ Luke Haines, who enlisted a clutch of studio room associates aged and new (maker Phil Vinall, cellist Wayne Banbury) to record 1997’s Baader Meinhof, an archive that mixed styles from the ’70s German urban terrorist group it took its name from …

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Leonard Cohen

Probably one of the most fascinating and enigmatic — otherwise probably the most successful — vocalist/songwriters from the past due ’60s, Leonard Cohen retained an viewers across six years of music-making, interrupted by various digressions into personal and creative exploration, which have got only put into the mystique surrounding him. …

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The Format

Self-described being a “desert pop” band, the Format materialized about two close friends, vocalist Nate Ruess and multi-instrumentalist Sam Means, in the first 2000s. Taking impact from ’60s music to build their very own spirited indie pop melodies, the Arizona-based set were barely within their twenties if they laid down …

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Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan’s impact on popular music is incalculable. Being a songwriter, he pioneered a number of different academic institutions of pop songwriting, from confessional vocalist/songwriter to winding, hallucinatory, stream-of-consciousness narratives. Like a vocalist, he broke down the idea that a vocalist will need to have a conventionally great voice to …

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Bad Religion

Out out of all the Southern Californian hardcore punk rings of the first ’80s, Poor Religion stayed across the longest. For over ten years, they maintained their underground reliability without turning out some indistinguishable records that sound exactly the same. Rather, the music group refined its strike, adding inflections of …

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Elvis Costello

When Elvis Costello’s first record premiered in 1977, his bristling cynicism and anger linked him using the punk and fresh influx explosion. A cursory pay attention to My Purpose Is True shows that the primary connection that Costello experienced using the punks was his unbridled enthusiasm; he tore through rock’s …

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