Home / Biography / Uriah Heep

Uriah Heep

Uriah Heep’s by-the-books progressive rock made the Uk band probably one of the most well-known hard rock sets of the first ’70s. Shaped by vocalist David Byron and guitarist Mick Package in the past due ’60s, the group experienced an astonishing variety of associates over another 2 decades — almost 30 different music artists transferred through the music group over time. Byron and Container were associates of the middle-’60s rock-band known as the Stalkers; once that music group split up, the duo produced another group known as Spice. Spice would ultimately become Uriah Heep in the past due ’60s, once Ken Hensley (electric guitar, keyboards, vocals) and bassist Paul Newton became a member of the pair. Ex – Spice drummer Alex Napier was the band’s drummer for a short period; he was quickly changed by Nigel Olsson. Uriah Heep released their debut record Extremely ‘eavy…Very ‘umble (called Uriah Heep in the U.S.) in 1970. Following its discharge, Keith Baker became the group’s drummer; he documented Salisbury, the group’s second record, before making a decision he couldn’t match the band’s comprehensive touring and was changed by Ian Clarke. Salisbury, having a 16-minute name track recorded using a 26-piece orchestra, showcased the band’s even more progressive tendencies. Afterwards that calendar year, Ian Clarke was changed by Lee Kerslake and Tag Clarke changed Newton; Tag Clarke quickly still left the music group and Gary Thain became the group’s bassist. This lineup of Uriah Heep was its most steady and well-known; you start with 1972’s Demons and Wizards, they released five albums between 1972 and 1975. After 1975, the band’s reputation began to slide. Byron still left the music group in 1977 and was changed by John Lawton, the group’s fortunes held declining directly into the first ’80s. Nevertheless, Uriah Heep soldiered on, carrying on release a albums in to the ’90s and 2000s. The record roster included Different Globe (1994), Ocean of Light (1995), Sonic Origami (1998), and Spellbinder (1999).

Check Also

Juan Formell

Perhaps one of the most influential Cuban music artists from the Castro period, Juan Formell …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *