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The Three Johns

A side group were only available in 1982 by Mekons co-founder Jon Langford, the Three Johns, originally composed of Langford, John Hyatt, Phillip “John” Brennan, and a drum machine, specific in abrasive, politically charged, danceable rock and roll. Sounding next to nothing like Langford’s primary music group, the Johns had been a silly-serious couple of politics and ethnic provocateurs. Recording through the elevation of Margaret Thatcher’s ill-conceived Tory rebellion, the Johns had been openly antagonistic to the new, conservative eyesight of Britain’s potential. Even though their elliptical and epigrammatic lyrics may not provide sloganeering that could easily recognize them as lefties, certainly there have been enough hints fell on the way to eliminate any question. Unlike other rock and roll agit-prop, the Johns performed a fairly available edition of polemical post-punk anti-pop that embraced big, messy arena-rock-sounding guitars and hard, recurring, quasi-hip-hop dance beats. Possibly the most subversive matter about the Johns can be that, despite Langford’s and Hyatt’s goofy vocals, these were, in their personal weird way, genuine pop for the present time people, especially those that hated Thatcher. With collective tongue planted securely in cheek, the Johns got on English and American obsession with materialism, the diabolical Reagan-Thatcher lovefest, the machinations from the pop music market, everything done with an excellent love of life mixed along with genuine dread and horror. Regularly hard to pin straight down, the Johns reveled in becoming slippery, exhibiting a like and loathing for pop music. In a few respects, the Johns resembled close friends and fellow Leeds, Britain mates the Gang of Four, but where in fact the Gang of Four was dour and significant (bordering on educational), the Johns had been loutish and boisterous, which when merging politics and rock and roll & move can, ultimately, be considered a good thing. Following the launch of Eat Your Sons in 1990, Jon Langford converted his interest full-time towards the Mekons, placing the Three Johns on what offers ended up being an indefinite sabbatical.

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