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The Flatlanders

Biography

The 1990 compilation from the Flatlanders’ entire recorded history wasn’t called Even more a Legend When compared to a Music group for nothing. Even though Lubbock, Texas-based group got the most severe business good fortune this aspect of Badfinger, rather than do manage a full-fledged discharge of their particular undertake traditional nation music throughout their early-’70s lifestyle, the three essential people — Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Joe Ely, and Butch Hancock — continued to be three of Tx’ esteemed vocalist/songwriters. Lubbock, a smallish university town in the center of the cotton-growing flatlands from the Western world Texas panhandle, can be both a fiercely traditional bastion of conventional values and, because of the surprisingly great liberal arts departments at Tx Tech University or college (and a member of family insufficient outside artistic affects), a location where artistically minded people can form a distinctive and original design all their personal. The Flatlanders embodied both edges of the dichotomy, that is what produced their music therefore endlessly interesting. The group started in 1970, when college close friends Hancock, Ely, and Gilmore all discovered themselves back Lubbock after having spent amount of time in San Francisco, European countries, and Austin, respectively. The three music artists roomed collectively and started playing together aswell, with several other regional music artists drifting in and from the lineup. In a short time, the group’s roster solidified with Gilmore on business lead vocals, Ely and Hancock on acoustic guitar, nonmusician friend Steve Wesson on autoharp and musical found (both which he discovered for the express reason for becoming a member of the group), Tommy Hancock (no connection) on fiddle, Sylvester Grain on upright bass, and Tony Pearson on mandolin. The group experienced only a small number of gigs before they cut an album-length tape at just a little studio room in Odessa, Tx in 1972, but nothing at all came from it, and it sat in Rice’s wardrobe in Lubbock unheard for a few 40 years before New Western Information released it because the Odessa Tapes in 2012. Per month after that overlooked 1972 program, the group journeyed to Nashville for another saving session. That one came about once the Flatlanders’ supervisor, Lou Driver, fulfilled with another Lubbock young man, Royce Clark, a freelance maker who worked well for Shelby Singleton (who at that time owned Sun Information). Far taken off its Sam Phillips glory times, Sun was at the moment a bit more when compared to a catalog which Singleton frequently plundered for his additional labels, including the bargain-basement reissue label Talk about and the hardly even more mainstream Plantation Information, whose colorful logo design was a fixture within the inexpensive bins at range stores and vehicle stops through the entire South. Clark confident Singleton to try the Lubbock guys out, plus they found its way to Nashville in March 1972, where they documented enough materials for a complete record. Singleton released a promo one from the group’s most powerful lower, “Dallas,” in past due April of this year. The one attracted zero radio attention, and even though the album have been learned and artwork ready, Singleton scrubbed the discharge. In 1973, Jimmie Dale & the Flatlanders was simply hardly released — on eight-track just. Even though tape arrived in these Southern variety shops and truck halts, an eight-track discharge on a hardly extant spending budget label with without any distribution may be the the next thing to no discharge in any way. The group came back to Lubbock and performed some more gigs, but Wesson, Pearson, and Tommy Hancock all still left the group by the finish of 1972. The primary trio played some more gigs and drifted aside a lot more than definitively splitting up. Normally, that could have already been that, but by the finish from the ’70s, Ely and Hancock had been cult heroes, because of their respective single albums, and Gilmore, who wrote several tunes for both of these but experienced retired from carrying out while he was learning using the Expert Maharaji, was among the hippest titles for Tx music followers to drop. Within the middle-’80s, Gilmore came back to carrying out in his used hometown of Austin, and there is even a short Flatlanders reunion in the Kerrville Folk Event in the past due ’80s. In 1990, following a couple of incomplete reissues of Flatlanders’ materials, Rounder Information released Even more a Legend When compared to a Music group, which reissued the initial Jimmie Dale & the Flatlanders recording, replacing the addresses of “Hello Stranger” and “Looking forward to a Teach” with four previously unreleased songs that were documented through the same classes. Almost a decade later on, the group reunited to execute a monitor for The Equine Whisperer’s soundtrack record. They liked their reunion a lot that they continuing to perform jointly, recording a fresh album called Today Again and striking the road to get a well-received concert tour. The trio that spent 30 years between their initial and second albums were able to decrease their downtime to only two years using the discharge of Tires of Lot of money in 2004; a uncommon concert documenting from the first ’70s, Live ’72, also came that season. Five years afterwards, the Flatlanders came back with another studio room album, Hillsides and Valleys, that your band documented with experienced pedal metal virtuoso (and acclaimed manufacturer) Lloyd Maines.

Quick Facts


Full Name The Flatlanders
Music Songs Tonight I Think I'm Gonna Go Downtown, You've Never Seen Me Cry, Stars In My Life, Down in My Hometown, Bhagavan Decreed, Homeland Refugee, South Wind of Summer, Rose From the Mountain, Keeper of the Mountain, Borderless Love, Wavin' My Heart Goodbye, Thank God for the Road, My Wildest Dreams Grow Wilder, Now It's Now Again, Pay the Alligator, My Wildest Dreams Grow Wilder Every Day, She Had Everything, Baby Do You Love Me Still?, Down in the Light of the Melon Moon, Jole Blon, If You Were A Bluebird, I Thought the Wreck Was Over, Shadow Of The Moon, Love's Own Chains, Wishing for a Rainbow, I Think Too Much Of You, No Way I'll Never Need You, One Road More, Back to My Old Molehill, All You Are Love, You Make It Look Easy, Wheels of Fortune
Albums The Odessa Tapes, Now Again, More a Legend Than a Band, Hills and Valleys, Live at the One Knite June 8th, 1972, Highlights of the Flatlanders
Nominations Independent Music Award for Best Song - Story, Independent Music Award for Best Album - Alternative Country


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Soundtrack

Soundtrack

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Leaves of Grass 2009 performer: "My Wildest Dreams Go Wilder Every Day"

Self

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Late Show with David Letterman 1998-2009 TV Series Themselves / Themselves - Musical Guest
WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour 2006 TV Series Themselves
Austin City Limits 2002 TV Series documentary Themselves

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