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Ten Kens

Having fulfilled at art college in 2003, Dan Workman and Dean Tzenos soon realized that they had a music kinship that simply needed to be explored. With Tzenos on electric guitar and Workman offering unnervingly angelic vocals that may use a scream immediately, the pair applied with different drummers before breaking apart and hiring a townhouse within their hometown of Toronto with the purpose of recording an recording beneath the name Ten Kens. A 12 months later on, the duo surfaced with a demonstration that captured the hearing of FatCat Information, who snapped them up amidst a flurry of label curiosity. Fleshing out the lineup with Lee Stringle on bass, and lastly settling for any drummer in Ryan Roantree, Ten Kens had been arranged to transform their early recordings into what will be their debut, self-titled recording. Documented in Montreal and made by Colin Stewart (Dark Mountain, Pretty Ladies Make Graves) in June 2007 and released in Sept 2008, Ten Kens drew motivation sonically from famous brands Nirvana with the Drive-In, while frequently rumbling along at a tempo and with an attitude comparable to contemporaries Dark Rebel Motorcycle Golf club and the Dark Angels. Originally schooled like a jazz drummer, Ryan Roantree’s design by no means allowed the music to be stale, while Tzenos’ shipped acoustic guitar riffs shimmered and crunched in equivalent measure. In the mean time, Workman’s vocals — drenched in distorted results — breathed existence into frequently cavernous soundscapes, like the moving first fifty percent of “Processed,” which ultimately twists and builds right into a vicious finale. Having backed famous brands A LOCATION to Bury Strangers and Sian Alice Group in the us and across European countries, Ten Kens’ arrangements for another record strike turbulence as Dean Tzenos still left the band. Thankfully, a motivated Dan Workman had not been going to allow project stall, attracting Brett Paulin on electric guitar, while John Sullivan finished the brand new line-up, changing Lee Stringle on bass. The effect was For Posterity; a far more accomplished, brutal, and direct pay attention than Ten Kens, it had been evident that there is already an extraordinary musical understanding between Workman and Paulin. Recalling Ten Kens’ fledgling documenting processes, the music group locked themselves apart with — as the frontman place it — “no outsiders, no interruptions, no sunshine” to make a darker, even more affecting record than its forerunner. On “Back again to Benign,” guitars explode into lifestyle along a dense bassline that creeps and stalks across Dan Workman’s pained vocals, which play an even more main function than on Ten Kens. On the other hand, “Screaming Viking” phone calls on Dark Sabbath and Led Zeppelin-esque riffs and energy to intimidate the listener as very much since it entertains. For 2012’s Namesake, Brett Paulin and Dan Workman continuing to grow as a group, engineering and making an record which voyaged into darker and even more psychedelic landscape than Ten Kens’ previously work. Produced during a rigorous year-long period, Namesake was crafted in several studios, utilizing a entire host of methods to be able to create a audio the music group — once more totally isolated for a whole task — was pleased with. The producing record features famous brands opener “Loss of life in the Family members,” a seven-and-a-half-minute musical trip that begins having a bassline recalling Red Floyd before swirling levels of vocals and acoustic guitar arrive, offering a mesmerizing, furious crescendo that ultimately collapses, apparently under its weight. In the mean time, the sobering melody of “The Field Around Your Vehicle” is definitely contrasted from the explosive, monumental riffs of “German Purity,” around which Workman’s vocals weave themselves brilliantly.

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