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Tag Archives: November 4

Charles Tournemire

A precocious kid, Charles Tournemire was appointed organist from the cathedral of St. Pierre in Bordeaux at age 11. He examined on the Conservatoire de Paris with César Franck and Charles-Marie Widor, earning in 1891 the initial prize in body organ; he also examined with d’Indy in the Schola Cantorum. …

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Monsueto

Monsueto’s profession had 2 times: he began to be successful in the first ’50s with tracks like “Me personally Deixa em Paz,” “Mora na Filosofia,” “Mulher de Mau Pensar,” and “A Fonte Secou,” recorded by performers want Linda Batista and Marlene. In 1966, Maria Bethânia documented “Mora na Filosofia,” accompanied …

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Carl Tausig

Karol (or Carl) Tausig was the boy of Aloys Tausig (1820 – 1885), students of Thalberg, and a composer. When the youngster was 14, Aloys got him to Liszt, who instantly prompted him and got him on as students. Liszt got Carl on concert travels and trained him counterpoint, structure, …

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Gregory Porter

Jazz, spirit, and gospel vocalist, songwriter, and professional Gregory Porter was created in LA but was raised in Bakersfield, California, where his mom was a minister. As a kid, he fell beneath the spell of his mother’s Nat Ruler Cole records, understanding how to imitate Cole, but his early dreams …

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Willie Borum

b. 4 November 1911, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, d. c.60s. Borum discovered guitar as a kid from his dad and Jim Jackson, afterwards adding harmonica, which he discovered very much from Noah Lewis. He performed in the roads in jug rings, and proved helpful in Mississippi with Garfield Akers, Willie Dark …

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Jerome Hopkins

Jermoe Hopkins was a self-taught organist, pianist and composer. Participating in the College or university of Vermont, he had written many manuscripts today at Harvard College or university. Hopkins was a performer, lecturer, creator from the Orpheon Free of charge Schools for Kids, and an editor from the “Philharmonic Journal.” …

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Daron Hagen

The music of Daron Aric Hagen is notable because of its warm lyricism, but his style defies easy categorization. While his functions demonstrate fluency with a variety of twentieth hundred years compositional methods, those techniques are supplementary to his exploitation and extension of the options of tonal tranquility, offering his …

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Joseph Canteloube

Most notable simply because an arranger of French folk tracks, Canteloube is unfortunately overlooked being a author of original music. He’s primarily appreciated for the Chants d’Auvergne (1930-1932), four models of folk tracks for tone of voice and piano or orchestra, broadly enjoyed because of their color, naturalistic beauty, and …

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Speed Webb

b. Lawrence Arthur Webb, 18 July 1906, Peru, Indiana, USA, d. 4 November 1994. As a kid he learned to try out both violin and mellophone but ultimately used the drums as his primary device. After playing locally for a short while, he analyzed embalming, intent on the career like …

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Simon Spillett

b. 4 November 1974, Britain. Prompted by his semi-professional trombonist dad, Spillett researched music from early years as a child. His first teacher was Vic Ash through whom he started a lifelong habit of hearing carefully to various other music artists, both and on record. Through the last mentioned medium, …

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