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Tag Archives: Maceo Parker

Junior Walker

Motown’s skilled but mainly anonymous instrumentalists very seldom stepped from their very own. The lone exception towards the guideline was tenor saxman Junior Walker, whose rough-and-ready, old-school R&B was a proclaimed contrast using the label’s typically soft, polished item. Walker’s squealing gutbucket design was motivated by leap blues and early …

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Robert Kyle

A plausible synonym for versatility is possibly Robert Kyle. Blessed, raised, and employed in LA, Kyle is certainly adept at a number of jazz settings and his executing retains its advanced, regardless of the design he’s asked to try out. One reason behind his adroitness is the fact that he …

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Dawn Silva

A funk diva of epic proportions, Sacramento, CA-born Dawn Silva’s music voyage began definately not her association with George Clinton’s P-Funk empire, singing music within the vein of early ’70s Best 40 as part of Windsong, a higher college group led by Silva and her sister. Her stylistic transformation would …

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Deee-Lite

Using the massive popularity of their hit single “Groove Is in the Heart,” Deee-Lite brought the colorful sights and sounds of New York’s club culture in to the mainstream. Shaped in 1986, the trio was led by vocalist Woman Miss Kier (created Kieren Kirby in Youngstown, Ohio) and fleshed out …

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Deep Banana Blackout

The group Deep Banana Blackout, who were only available in 1995, shows a multitude of influences: rock, funk, soul, jazz, Latin, and psychedelia. On a far more general level, for their pursuing, busy touring plan, and abilities at improvisation, they’re regarded a jam music group. The group’s albums consist of …

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Maceo Parker

Among the essential sonic architects of funk, Maceo Parker initial became a tale for his use James Dark brown, whose impassioned shouts to get a sax single (“Maceo! Blow your horn!”) would make Parker the Godfather of Soul’s most well-known sideman, though Parker would continue steadily to enjoy a effective …

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Phelps “Catfish” Collins

Among the unsung architects of funk, Phelps “Catfish” Collins was created in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1944. Collins started playing acoustic guitar when he was youthful, and he later on taught his young sibling William “Bootsy” Collins to try out bass, refitting a vintage acoustic guitar into Bootsy’s 1st four-string. In …

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Fred Wesley

Because the longtime music director for soul star Adam Brown’s renowned backing unit the J.B.’s, trombonist Fred Wesley was the world’s most well-known sideman, orchestrating the sinuous grooves and contributing the vibrant, surgically precise solos that described the vocabulary of funk. Delivered July 4, 1943, in Columbus, GA, Wesley grew …

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Clyde Stubblefield

With Jabo Starks, drummer Stubblefield laid down the beat for James Brown’s biggest ’60s hits. Stubblefield helped travel such seminal Brownish funk-fests as “Mom Snacks,” “Chilly Perspiration,” “State It Noisy (I’m Dark and I’m Happy),” “I ACQUIRED the Feelin’,” and “Cool Drummer.” Stubblefield’s popular break within the second option was …

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The J.B.’s

The J.B.’s had been the legendary helping cast of music artists behind James Dark brown, earning a well-deserved popularity because the tightest, best-drilled instrumental outfit in every of funk. The name J.B.’s is normally most often connected with three hornmen specifically — saxophonists Maceo Parker and Alfred “Pee Wee” Ellis, …

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