Home / Tag Archives: Hard Bop (page 2)

Tag Archives: Hard Bop

Red Garland

Red Garland blended together the most common influences of his generation (Nat Cole, Bud Powell, and Ahmad Jamal) into his very own exclusive approach; Garland’s stop chords themselves became important in the players from the 1960s. He began playing clarinet and alto, switching to piano when he was 18. During …

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Melvin Rhyne

Organist Melvin Rhyne’s best popularity was his involvement on 4 Wes Montgomery Riverside classes (including Montgomery’s initial and last record for the label). Thankfully, Rhyne survived lengthy more than enough, after some low fat years, to come back towards the major-league jazz picture and record some CDs of his personal. …

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Ray Copeland

An accomplished composer and instructor, Ray Copeland was a good trumpeter from your ’40s before ’80s in golf swing, bebop, hard bop, and despite having stage rings. He offered many workshops and jazz background programs, and his playing shown a confident, interesting firmness and crackling energy, aswell as effective range …

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Ray Bryant

Although he could generally play bop, Ray Bryant’s using combined jointly older elements (including blues, boogie-woogie, gospel, as well as stride) right into a distinctive, soulful, and swinging style; no-one performed “After Hours” that can compare with him. Younger sibling of bassist Tommy Bryant as well as the uncle of …

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Ralph MacDonald

A busy studio room musician during a lot of his profession, Ralph MacDonald added colorful noises and catchy rhythms to a huge selection of saving classes. His father’s music group performed calypso in Harlem, and it experienced a strong impact on his playing, as do a ten-year stint (1961-1971) with …

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Ralph Lalama

A fantastic if underrated tenor saxophonist who frequently sounds directly from the prime many years of Blue Note (most influenced simply by Hank Mobley and Sonny Rollins), Ralph Lalama is a dear soloist in many records. Blessed to a drummer and a vocalist, Lalama is a area of the NY …

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McCoy Tyner

It really is to McCoy Tyner’s great credit that his profession after John Coltrane continues to be definately not anti-climatic. Along with Costs Evans, Tyner continues to be the most important pianist in jazz of days gone by 50 years, along with his chord voicings getting adopted and employed by …

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Randy Klein

An excellent pianist and a talented lyricist, Randy Klein produced a solid impression in 1994 for the tune lyrics he contributed to his Jazzheads Compact disc. In 1995, he documented a sensitive group of duets that showcased the audio of bassist Harvie Swartz. In any other case, he spent some …

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Rahn Burton

An excellent pianist who began taking part in professionally in Louisville through the ’50s, Rahn Burton started with Rahsaan Roland Kirk in 1953, and toured with him through the Midwest for six years. Among Kirk’s first Argo albums included a Burton structure. Burton toured with George Adams, playing body organ …

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Nate Birkey

Although a quintessentially west coast jazz musician, trumpeter/vocalist Nate Birkey is a Midwestern native given birth to in Indiana and raised in Colorado. Having a smooth, tenor tone of voice and pining trumpet audio Birkey pulls easy evaluations with “interesting college” luminaries such as for example Chet Baker, Kilometers Davis …

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