Home / Tag Archives: Brown-Eyed Soul

Tag Archives: Brown-Eyed Soul

Señor Soul

Senor Spirit recorded some good spirit music, usually though not necessarily instrumental, in 1967-70 with Latin and funk tinges. That is the sort of music that Battle took to the very best of the graphs in the 1970s, as well as the similarities between your two rings aren’t a coincidence. …

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The Invictas

Rochester, NY music group that had a big community hit using the rudimentary dance track “The Hump,” though a state around the liner records to an recording sleeve that this solitary even outstripped product sales from the Beatles in the brand new York State region is most likely fatuous. (Unless …

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Cannibal & the Headhunters

Cannibal & the Headhunters were one-hit wonders, but just what a hit to get, if you are only likely to possess 1: “Property of 1000 Dances.” The group was also among the 1st Mexican-American rock rings to truly have a nationwide hit record, thanks to that same tune. Founded by …

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Brenton Wood

Brenton Wood’s charmingly unpredictable phrasing and his infectious feeling of memories made the steady uptown spirit of “The Oogum Boogum Melody” and “Gimme Small Indication” into strikes in 1967. Despite his skill being a pop-soul vocalist, Hardwood was never in a position to match such levels again, however those two …

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Tierra

An early-’70s spin-off group from Un Chicano, Tierra held plugging aside until 1980, if they scored some short success around the R&B graphs doing Afro-Latin-flavored spirit addresses. Guitarist Rudy and trombonist/percussionist Steve Salas experienced both experienced Un Chicano. They teamed with keyboardist Joey Guerra, bassist Steve Falomir, drummer Philip Madayag, …

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Velveteens

In 1998, sisters Amy and Meagan Alwood began performing as an acoustic duo in Columbus, OH. Amy published the majority of their tunes, and after many local musicians contacted them about beginning a full music group they extended the lineup. The music group was by no means quite solidified until …

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Brothers of Soul

The Brothers of Spirit were a vocal trio made up of Fred Bridges, Richard Knight, and Bobby Eaton, who released many singles within a steady, uptown, Motown-derived vein. Their biggest strike was 1968’s “I ASSUME That Don’t Make Me a Loser,” released on Boo Information, which scraped the low reaches …

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The Romancers

In the first and mid-’60s, this group was one of the originators from the East LA Sound, a gritty type of blue-eyed soul that took main within the Latin-American community specifically. The Romancers’ instrumental albums for the Del-Fi label had been common, if solid, sax-driven R&B/rock and roll hybrids, probably …

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Thee Midniters

Indisputably the best Latino rock-band from the ’60s, Thee Midniters took their inspiration from both British Invasion sound from the Rolling Stones as well as the even more traditional R&B that these were weaned about within their native LA. Hugely well-known in East LA, the group, offering both guitars and …

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The Olympics

The Olympics were among the great L.A.-centered acts who were able to score local hits for the Western Coast by balancing upbeat and frequently funny novelty R&B tunes with those on the subject of well-known dances of your day (a number of the additional Western Coast groups who in shape …

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