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Tag Archives: Billy Eckstine

Bobby Wade

Though not really from Cleveland, OH, aficionados of C-Town-based music have adopted Bobby Wade like a indigenous son. The elegant singer was created in Meadville, PA, on, may 19, 1942, and created a like for spirit music, hearing Porky Chadwick, an R&B DJ out of Pittsburgh. Meadville’s African-American populace was …

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Johnny Pace

A ballad and blues singer with small recordings, Speed was overshadowed by Sinatra, but rivaled Johnny Desmond, Chet Baker, and Bobby Darin.

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Ed Reed

Jazz vocalist and lifestyle survivor Ed Reed spent his youth developing up in W, CA in the 1930s and ’40s where he found a few performing tips from jazz great Charles Mingus who all occasionally minded his sister’s kids inside your home next door from where Reed lived. Reed still …

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Herb Jeffries

Although not just a jazz singer, Herb Jeffries was the last surviving person in the 1940 Duke Ellington Orchestra and an excellent interpreter of swing tracks and ballads. He performed with Erskine Tate in the first ’30s, Earl Hines (1931-1934), and Blanche Calloway, before getting the first dark cowboy professional …

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Arthur Prysock

Arthur Prysock was perfectly in the home performing jazz, blues, or R&B, but his smooth-as-silk baritone produced him a superbly effective (and underappreciated) pop crooner in the way of his key impact, Billy Eckstine. Prysock was created January 2, 1929, in Spartanburg, SC, and was the sibling of saxophonist Crimson …

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Taswell Baird

Taswell Baird, Jr., towered among the preeminent trombonists of bebop’s heyday, collaborating with giants including Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker. Blessed in St. Louis on June 24, 1922, Baird — categorised as “Small Joe” per his middle name — obtained his initial trombone at age group 12 and by his …

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John Malachi

A sophisticated pianist, John Malachi spent the majority of his profession accompanying top jazz-oriented singers. A self-taught pianist, Malachi’s initial important musical work was with Trummy Youthful from 1943-44. He was an associate of the traditional Billy Eckstine Bebop Orchestra from 1944-45, adding both piano solos and advanced preparations. Malachi …

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Earl Coleman

An excellent ballad singer having a deep baritone tone of voice influenced by Billy Eckstine, Earl Coleman produced his place ever sold by saving “THAT IS Constantly” and “Dark Shadows” in 1947, while becoming accompanied by Charlie Parker. He previously sung previously with Jay McShann (1943) and Earl Hines (1944). …

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Barkin’ Bill

Blessed using a lush, deeply burnished baritone that’s seemingly the antithesis from the rough-hewn Chicago blues appear, Barkin’ Costs Smith finally broke through in 1994 along with his have debut album for Delmark. Inspired by famous brands Joe Williams (Count number Basie’s simple crooner, not really the gruff nine-string guitarist), …

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Chris Ellis

British jazz experienced Chris Ellis is definitely a perfect exemplory case of a skilled singer that has spent a lot of his career in back of the scenes. Like a vocalist, Ellis offers recorded infrequently over time — much towards the regret of his supporters — but he has already …

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