Home / Biography / Skip Spence

Skip Spence

Like a tough, more obscure counterpart to Syd Barrett, Omit Spence was among the past due ’60s’ most colorful acidity casualties. The initial Jefferson Aircraft drummer (although he was a guitarist who acquired never performed drums before signing up for the group), Spence still left after their first record to become listed on Moby Grape. Like every person in that legendary music group, he was a solid presence on the first record, playing guitar, performing, and composing “Omaha.” The group went into tough situations in 1968, and Spence acquired the roughest, flipping out and (based on varying accounts) working amok in an archive studio using a fireplace axe; he finished up being focused on New York’s Bellevue Medical center. Upon his launch, Spence lower an acid-charred traditional, Oar, in 1969. Though released on a significant label (Columbia), this is reportedly among the lowest-selling products in its catalog and it is hence probably one of the most appreciated psychedelic collector products. Much rawer and much more homespun compared to the early Grape information, it features Spence on all (mainly acoustic) guitars, percussion, and vocals. With an overriding blues impact and dosages of nation, gospel, and acidity freakout tossed in, this noises something similar to Mississippi Fred McDowell imbued using the nature of Haight-Ashbury 1967. In addition, it presented cryptic, punning lyrics and wraithlike vocals that range between a minimal Fred Neil with gravel hoarseness to some hardly there high wisp. Unfortunately, it had been his only single recording; more unfortunately, mental illness avoided Spence from achieving a completely functional state through the entire remainder of his life time. He died Apr 16, 1999, simply two days lacking his 54th birthday; the tribute recording, Even more Oar: A Tribute to Alexander “Neglect” Spence, offering shows by Robert Vegetable, Beck, and Tom Waits, made an appearance just a couple weeks later.

Check Also

Pegboy

Something of the Chicago punk supergroup, Pegboy carried the torch for the city’s vintage post-hardcore …