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Jimmie Noone

Considered among the 3 top Fresh Orleans clarinetists from the 1920s (with Johnny Dodds and Sidney Bechet), Jimmie Noone experienced a smoother tone than his contemporaries that appealed to players from the golf swing era (including Benny Goodman). He performed guitar as a kid, and at age group 15 required clarinet lessons from Lorenzo Tio, Jr. and Sidney Bechet (the second option was just 13, shockingly plenty of). Noone created quickly, and he used Freddie Keppard (1913-1914), Friend Petit, as well as the Youthful Olympia Music group (1916), which he also led. In 1917, he visited Chicago to become listed on Keppard’s Creole music group. After it split up the following 12 months he joined up with King Oliver’s music group, keeping until he became a member of Doc Cook’s Dreamland Orchestra (1920-1926). Although Noone documented with Cook, it had been when he began leading a music group on the Apex Membership that he strike his stride. By 1928, he previously pianist Earl Hines and altoist Joe Poston within the uncommon quintet (Poston trapped to playing melodies behind Noone), and was documenting for Vocalion, creating traditional music including an early on edition of “Lovely Lorraine” (his theme tune) and “4 or 5 Moments.” Noone proved helpful gradually in Chicago through the entire 1930s (although he received much less attention through the jazz globe), and he utilized Charlie Shavers on a few of his past due-’30s recordings and welcomed the youthful vocalist Joe Williams towards the bandstand; sadly, they never documented jointly. In 1944, Noone is at Kid Ory’s music group on the Western world Coast and appeared for the brink of better popularity when he unexpectedly passed away. Thanks to Western european reissue series, Jimmie Noone’s recordings are plentiful on Compact disc. His boy, Jimmie Noone, Jr., abruptly emerged away from obscurity within the 1980s to try out clarinet and tenor using the Cheathams.

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