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James “Stump” Johnson


Through the first fifty percent of the 20th century there have been several noteworthy African-American pianists called James Johnson. Most well-known was New Jersey-born Wayne P. Johnson, the daddy of Harlem stride piano. Wayne “Steady Move” Johnson was from New Orleans, worked well in St. Louis, and is principally remembered because the sibling of guitarist Lonnie Johnson. Wayne “Stump” Johnson was created in Tennessee in 1902, and relocated to St. Louis along with his family members in the impressionable age group of seven. Fascinated with the city’s flourishing music picture, he idolized Child Long, who resided near 15th and Morgan and performed frequently at a location known as Shoes’ around the Levee. Johnson recalled hearing him play piano there and through the entire levee area, a flourishing business middle that catered to rich slumming tourists new from the riverboats. Based on Johnson, Very long was a boogie-woogie pioneer. Aspiring to emulate his hero, the son taught himself to try out piano in the rear of a pool hall and finally secured regular work in the city’s many wearing homes. Because Johnson was brief and stocky, he became referred to as “Stump” or “Small Guy.” He was “found out” by QRS skill scout Arthur E. Satherly in January 1929 while playing piano in an archive store on Marketplace Street possessed by his sibling, Jesse Johnson, who also worked well as a program coordinator for numerous record brands. Stump’s first information had been cut in Long Isle City, NY soon afterwards. From your get-go, he was recognized on record brands as Wayne “Stump” Johnson, although he’d also record as Shorty George and Snitcher Roberts. Through the 12 months 1929, he waxed information for Brunswick and OKeh in Chicago, Illinois as well as for Paramount in Richmond, Indiana. He cut several edges for Paramount in Grafton, Wisconsin in Feb 1930, made an excellent double-sided 78-rpm record for Victor with Roosevelt Sykes in Dallas, Tx in Feb 1932, and cut three game titles for Bluebird in Chicago on August 2, 1933 with Pinetop Aaron Sparks and Dorothea Trowbridge. The closest that Johnson ever surely got to having popular was his very own structure “The Duck’s Yas Yas.” He’s also credited because the author of “Snitcher’s Blues” and “Don’t Provide My Lard Apart.” Tampa Crimson protected “The Duck’s Yas Yas,” and do up “Snitcher’s Blues” beneath the name “Friendless Blues.” Although he proved helpful in night clubs throughout St. Louis for quite some time, decades would move before Stump experienced another opportunity to record. After providing in the next World Battle, he fulfilled up with blues enthusiast and officer Charles “Lindy” O’Brien. Furthermore to motivating him to continue gigging, their companionship resulted in Johnson learning to be a cop (Washboard Sam’s selected nonmusical occupation), and a taxes collector. In the past due ’50s, he commenced co-managing the DeLuxe Cafe in St. Louis with sister-in-law Edith North Johnson, who experienced documented with Roosevelt Sykes back 1929. Stump produced a small number of recordings in 1964 for Euphonic and offered music for the soundtrack from the film Blues Like Showers of Rainfall, which arrived in 1970. He succumbed to esophageal malignancy in the Veteran’s Medical center in St. Louis on Dec 5, 1969. Wayne “Stump” Johnson shouldn’t be puzzled with hypothetical alto and soprano saxophonist Stump Johnson, whose probably erroneous name is usually listed within the staff from a Ma Rainey saving program that occurred in Feb 1926. That musician, whose identification hasn’t been fully founded, could have been Paul “Stump” Evans, if not Barney Bigard.

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Died December 5, 1969, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
Profession Singer

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