Home / Biography / Harry “Fats” Crafton

Harry “Fats” Crafton

Harry Crafton was among the better — and, ultimately, unfairly neglected — guitarists to emerge from the postwar period. He carved a little but special market for himself in Philadelphia starting soon after Globe War II, reducing for the string of indepedent brands with a electric guitar audio that was intensely inspired by Tiny Grimes and a performing design reminscent of Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson. What small anyone appears to find out about Harry “Extra fat” Crafton mainly concerns his profession. Not only is it agreed upon to Ivin Ballen’s Gotham Information as an musician in 1949, he previously a romantic relationship with the business being a songwriter beginning early in 1950, that was how he was most noticeable within the business. Crafton’s songwriting credits frequently come in confunction with bandleader and skill scout Doc Bagby and composer Don Keene. He led several his very own, known initial as the Jivetones and down the road as the Build Tones, and in addition played in rings led by Doc Bagby. He was prominently highlighted with Bagby’s music group on sides acknowledged to the first choice. In 1950, Crafton trim an instrumental, “Electric guitar Boogie”-dominated by his electric guitar and an unidentified saxman (probably Tiny Grimes music group alumnus Joe Sewell) — that was five years before its period as a bit of primordial rock and roll ‘n move. In 1951, Crafton started documenting for the Jarman label in East Newark, NJ, using a music group known as the Sonotones, including jazz organist Jimmy Smith (simply out of music college at that time) in its line-up. By 1954, he was leading the Art Shades, whose line-up, at least at one stage, included Sewell on tenor sax, Jimmy Johnson on drums, and Doc Starkes on bass, aswell as Agnes Riley as vocalist with Crafton. Those edges rock and roll actually harder than Crafton’s early ’50s leap blues figures, and you can just question at their failing to discover at least a cult target audience, although game titles like “Big Unwanted fat Hot Pet dog, ” sung by Riley, had been probably as well risque for just about any radio place in the united states to play intensely. Crafton, Sewell, Starkes, and Johnson eventually joined r&b vocalist (and RCA-Victor alumnus) Melvin Smith in The Nite Riders Orchestra, who trim edges for M-G-M, Swan, and Sue Information, among other brands, during the past due 1950’s and early 1960’s. There is nothing known of Crafton’s whereabouts in music or somewhere else since the middle-1960’s, though it is certainly stated that he went a record shop in Philadelphia sooner or later.

Check Also

Roosevelt Sykes

Next time somebody voices the goofball opinion that blues is just too big depressing to …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *