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Al Collins

Aside from the famous blues guitarist Albert Collins, there are many performers with this genre using the same name who utilized the less formal Al Collins. That one was mixed up in ’30s and ’40s, his phoning cards a homemade device simply referred to as the “homemade bass” or the “imitation bass.” Another performer of the type was Albert Elkins; both instrumentalists grew from the wealthy custom of concocting bass tools out of whatever is actually lying down around, including washtubs, buckets, and containers. Sometimes a straight better bass audio could be made out of a more substantial resonator that couldn’t probably be referred to as “laying around,” like the side of the barn. Both Elkins and Collins worked well in the combos of Jazz Gillum, whose full recordings have already been reissued within the Record label. Aside from the homemade rigs, both bassists also used real upright basses on a number of the paths. Along with players such as for example Ransom Knowling and Costs Settles, Collins’ basslines had been an important area of the history transition between nation blues, where the usage of bass occasionally seems as an afterthought, and a fresh urban blues that might be dominated by very much louder and finally funkier basslines.

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